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Archive for for September, 2016

Texas Law Update: Can I Make My Employee Sign a Non-Compete/Non-Solicit? (Part II)

September 29, 2016

For a non-compete/non-solicit to be enforceable under Texas law, it must be reasonable as to time, geographic area, and scope of activity.  Needless to say, it is a fact-specific inquiry and there is no one-size-fits-all answer.  Generally speaking, however, a restrictive covenant that does not bear some relation to the activities of the employee or that contains an industry-wide exclusion from subsequent employment is unreasonable.[1]  And as you will see, it is often necessary to look at all the restraints together to determine the reasonableness of a non-compete/non-solicit as a whole.… Read the rest

When a Business Partnership Turns Out To Be a Bait-and-Switch (Part II)

September 27, 2016

Soon after Hogan was brought in as a 1/3 owner of Turbine Asset Holdings, LLC (“TAH”), he began assisting TAH with business opportunities using his contacts and expertise.[1]  One such opportunity involved Pratt & Whitney (“Pratt”), which was expected to be a very substantial inventory management opportunity worth at least $80MM of a net profit.  Hogan led the day-to-day discussions and planning with Pratt and kept Glassman informed of the progress, while Glassman started contacting banks to finance the deal. … Read the rest

Texas Law Update: Can I Make My Employee Sign a Non-Compete/Non-Solicit? (Part I)

September 22, 2016

In our previous blog series “Covenant Not To Compete When Buying or Selling a Business,” we looked at several state laws governing covenants not to compete in the context of buying or selling a business.  This time, we will look at Texas law in depth, focusing on non-competition and non-solicitation covenants in the employment context.  As we mentioned before, a non-compete is enforceable in Texas if: (i) it is part of an otherwise enforceable agreement at the time the agreement is made; (iii) the restraint imposed is no greater than is necessary to protect the goodwill or other business interests at issue; and (ii) it is reasonable as to time, geographic area, and scope of activity to be restrained.… Read the rest

September Book Review

September 20, 2016

September Book Reviews

This blog post is the second in a new series on book reviews. The following books are motivational page-turners, emphasizing how to achieve personal and business-related success. These books may pique the interest of an attorney looking to market their firm, or business owners looking to broaden their knowledge, on hot topics in business right now.

For business owners, The 10X Mind Expander by Dan Sullivan, a strategic planner and CEO of The Strategic Coach, is a great book on thinking about business expansion in exponential and non-linear terms.… Read the rest

When a Business Partnership Turns Out To Be a Bait-and-Switch (Part I)

September 15, 2016

Here at The R. Shawn McBride Law Firm, PLLC, we write frequently about partnership, LLC, and multi-owner entities.  In most, if not all, cases or situations we discuss, business partners start out on friendly terms, in a spirit of collaboration and genuine partnership, only to see their relationship deteriorate over time due to disagreements over management, ownership, or other matters.  But what if there is no intent to be business partners in the first place?  AerReach Aero Space Solutions, LLC v.Read the rest

When Do You Need Securities Law Advice?

September 13, 2016

Startups and early-stage companies often ask us when they need securities law advice (other than when obviously dealing with securities).  Our answer is: as soon as you start thinking about raising capital or bringing in investors.  Here’s why.

Under the federal securities laws, a company may not offer or sell securities unless the offering has been registered with the SEC or an exemption from registration is available.  The legal definition of “security” is extremely broad and includes, among other things:

“any note, stock, treasury stock, security future, security-based swap, bond, debenture, certificate of interest or participation in any profit-sharing agreement or in any oil, gas, or other mineral royalty or lease, .… Read the rest

When Things Fall Apart: Business Partnership, Disagreement, and Dissolution (Part IV)

September 8, 2016

In Mizrahi v. Cohen,[1] a dentist and an optometrist formed a limited liability company for the purpose of the construction and operation of a mixed-use building in which they intended to set up their respective offices.  The two did not have an LLC agreement at the time they formed the LLC; it was executed a few months later when they purchased the land.  The lender required an LLC agreement and the attorney who represented both members at the closing drafted an LLC agreement. … Read the rest

When Things Fall Apart: Business Partnership, Disagreement, and Dissolution (Part III)

September 6, 2016

In Saunders v. Firtel, as in Cline v. Grelock, the two business partners were close friends.[1]  Firtel was the sole owner of a pharmaceutical sales corporation called Adco and Saunders was a sales representative for a medical supply company.  In 1986, the two decided to enter into a formal business relationship by allowing Saunders to obtain a 49% shareholder interest in Adco and to become an employee of the company.  Their written agreement provided that both would devote their time and efforts to the business and receive an equal combination of compensation and fringe benefits but also allowed Firtel to spend considerable time away and apart from the business. … Read the rest

All postings are intended to be planning tools to familiarize readers with some of the high-level issues discussed therein. No posting is intended to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your transaction planners including attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances. This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity.