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Charging Orders: Is a Creditor of an LLC Member Necessarily a Creditor of the LLC? (Part II)

July 26, 2016

Merrill Ranch Properties, LLC v. Austell[1] involved a bank loan to an LLC, secured by certain property in Arizona and guaranteed by an affiliated individual and eight trust entities he controlled.  At some point, the loan was declared in default and the bank filed a lawsuit in Arizona against the borrower and the guarantors to recover the balance of the loan.  The lawsuit eventually settled.  Subsequently, however, the plaintiff discovered that shortly after the loan was declared in default, three LLCs with corporate relationships to the guarantor transferred certain assets to various newly-created entities that were, in turn, directly or indirectly owned by trusts controlled by the guarantor.  … Read the rest

Charging Orders: Is a Creditor of an LLC Member Necessarily a Creditor of the LLC? (Part I)

July 19, 2016

In our previous blog series on Comparison of LLC Statutes, we briefly touched on the concept of LLC charging order.  In many states, including Delaware, New York, and Texas, a creditor with a judgment against an LLC member can apply for a charging order to satisfy the judgment.  That way, the creditor gets the right to receive distributions from the LLC to which the debtor/member would otherwise have been entitled.  A charging order may or may not be the exclusive remedy by which a creditor may satisfy a judgment out of the debtor’s LLC interest, depending on the jurisdiction, and this can make a big difference if the LLC does not make any distributions.… Read the rest

Charging Orders: Is a Creditor of an LLC Member Necessarily a Creditor of the LLC? (Part II)

May 31, 2016

Merrill Ranch Properties, LLC v. Austell[1] involved a bank loan to an LLC, secured by certain property in Arizona and guaranteed by an affiliated individual and eight trust entities he controlled.  At some point, the loan was declared in default and the bank filed a lawsuit in Arizona against the borrower and the guarantors to recover the balance of the loan.  The lawsuit eventually settled.  Subsequently, however, the plaintiff discovered that shortly after the loan was declared in default, three LLCs with corporate relationships to the guarantor transferred certain assets to various newly-created entities that were, in turn, directly or indirectly owned by trusts controlled by the guarantor.  … Read the rest

Charging Orders: Is a Creditor of an LLC Member Necessarily a Creditor of the LLC? (Part I)

May 24, 2016

In our previous blog series on Comparison of LLC Statutes, we briefly touched on the concept of LLC charging order.  In many states, including Delaware, New York, and Texas, a creditor with a judgment against an LLC member can apply for a charging order to satisfy the judgment.  That way, the creditor gets the right to receive distributions from the LLC to which the debtor/member would otherwise have been entitled.  A charging order may or may not be the exclusive remedy by which a creditor may satisfy a judgment out of the debtor’s LLC interest, depending on the jurisdiction, and this can make a big difference if the LLC does not make any distributions.… Read the rest

Will Your Personal Obligations Cause You To Lose Control of Your LLC? LLC Charging Order Update: Vision Marketing Resources, Inc. v. McMillin Group, LLC (Part 2)

December 29, 2015

Vision Marketing Resources, Inc. v. McMillin Group, LLC.

 In Vision Marketing, the court first addressed whether it could issue a charging order against a non-Kansas LLC over which it did not have jurisdiction. There was no Kansas case law on this issue, so the court looked at several cases in which other state’s appellate courts held that the court need not have jurisdiction over the foreign LLC (i.e., those formed elsewhere) in order to issue a charging order against the interests of its members: for example, the Illinois Appellate Court found that a court only needs to have jurisdiction over the judgment debtor to enter charging orders against the judgment debtor’s interest, because charging orders on distributional interests do not affect the rights or interests of the LLC; and in Georgia, the Court of Appeals has likewise held that it is only necessary for a court to have jurisdiction over the judgment debtor to have the authority to enter charging orders against the judgment debtor’s interest because the LLC has no right or direct interest that is affected by the charging order.… Read the rest

Will Your Personal Obligations Cause You To Lose Control of Your LLC? LLC Charging Order Update: Vision Marketing Resources, Inc. v. McMillin Group, LLC

December 19, 2015

In our previous blog series on single-member LLCs and creditors’ rights (available here), we discussed charging order protection and courts’ application of the same to single-member LLCs. As we mentioned, the obvious purpose of charging order is to protect other members of an LLC from having involuntarily to share governance responsibilities with someone they did not choose or from having to accept a creditor of another member as a co-manager—that is, to protect the autonomy of the original members and their ability to manage their own enterprise.… Read the rest

LLC Owners, If You Owe Someone Money, Your Ownership of an LLC Might Not Be Protected: When It Comes to Single-Member LLCs, Charging Order May Not Be the Exclusive Remedy (Part 6)

December 5, 2015

After Olmstead v. FTC, a Florida Case with Potential National Implications.

The Florida Supreme Court’s opinion in Olmstead v. FTC created much uncertainty concerning charging order protection for multi-member LLCs in Florida[1] and seems to have been the catalyst for legislative action in Florida and Delaware, among others.

In 2011, the Florida legislature amended the Florida Revised Limited Liability Company Act to provide that a charging order is the sole and exclusive remedy by which a judgment creditor of a member or member’s transferee may satisfy a judgment from the judgment debtor’s interest in an LLC or rights to distributions from the LLC.… Read the rest

LLC Owners, If You Owe Someone Money, Your Ownership of an LLC Might Not Be Protected: When It Comes to Single-Member LLCs, Charging Order May Not Be the Exclusive Remedy (Part 5)

November 14, 2015

Real Life Stories (Cases) on the Issue: Olmstead v. FTC (Florida).

Olmstead v. FTC, a non-bankruptcy case, dealt with the question as to whether a court may order judgment debtor to surrender all right, title, and interest in the debtor’s single-member LLC to satisfy an outstanding judgment (not unlike the question of whether a debtor-member in bankruptcy transfers all of his or her interests in the LLC to the bankruptcy trustee).[1] In that case, the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) sued the defendants for unfair or deceptive trade practices involving an advance-fee credit card scam and obtained judgment for more than $10 million in restitution.… Read the rest

All postings are intended to be planning tools to familiarize readers with some of the high-level issues discussed therein. No posting is intended to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your transaction planners including attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances. This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity.